Classroom learning – and why some organisations still need it

Classroom learning has become increasingly viewed as an anachronistic method of helping people learn. It is said that it is of no benefit to the learner, a crutch for the ‘trainer’ and has no long term benefit. I prefer to see us, as a profession, increase our use of tools and investigate the most appropriate contexts for them, rather than completely dismiss them. I think we hold onto things too long, but then press delete too quickly. I completely understand people’s passion to progress the profession, but I remember learning in a classroom long ago something about babies and bathwater. The upcoming L&D Show will showcase some great progressive thinking, but I think it is important to make sure that we are increasing our toolkit rather than just substituting things in and out. So I had a think about classroom training and what it still offers. Should we be hitting delete?

I have definitely gained from experiences in the classroom. I have gained information, perspectives from other delegates and oh so many models and hours of PowerPoint watching. What is interesting is that of the things that I have gained in a classroom (I have a freakishly good memory and it has purposefully discarded a high percentage of those experiences) it would be fair to say that most of them could now be delivered through other channels or experiences.

An hour with a smartphone and a group of people talking in a cafe would probably have covered most of them off. A genuinely interactive online package with an effective FAQ would have covered most of the others off. Properly supported internal learning communities could have delivered almost everything I gained. Effectively curated content would have given me 80% of it. A MOOC would have delivered me content and expertise more fluidly. Twitter.

The one thing that classroom learning still does effectively is ringfence time. And time, to a degree, represents investment for many companies. It doesn’t necessarily indicate quality or care, but it does represent ringfenced investment. Those times that I was in a classroom with my blackberry switched off were times where I was properly focused on my own development and in sucking in knowledge. Also those times were a breather from the hectic pace of business life. A half or a whole day where I could hit pause.

So where does that leave my thoughts on classroom training? Well, broadly with the alternatives we now have available it seems a sticking plaster for organisations where the investment in learning comes in spurts and they are time poor. Like turning off your car for a bit to let it cool down because you forgot to keep it topped up with oil. In that position it makes sense to fill it up with oil, but if you can keep it topped up the whole time it is better for the engine. It’s a poor analogy but I’ve written so much of it now I’m going to stick with it.

All of the other ways of supporting learning are probably preferable – unless you are in an environment where you need to isolate people in an effort to help them learn. And in that environment the biggest block to ongoing learning is probably the culture. So does classroom learning still have a place?

It depends on how much you have faith that for your organisation’s ‘70:20:10‘ is in fact anywhere near that blend. If you are in fact not confident in day to day learning being supported then you probably need ringfenced classroom training – but only as long as your ambition is limited to developing people in protected environments and for a small percentage of their working lives. That might be due to budget or it might be down to resource. Or it might be because your people are so used to that format that you have conditioned them to feel most comfortable with learning in that space – and you don’t have the time or inclination to help them unlearn.

It’s a bit like having animals caged in a zoo for their own protection. We’d rather we didn’t have to – but in unique circumstances we need to intervene to protect. Where do you need to limit learning to a classroom? Where learning is endangered if you don’t. Just appreciate that in the same way caged animals aren’t fulfilling all they could be…

#CIPD13 – Celebrations and frustrations

So.

A long time ago my HR dept used to do ‘celebrations and frustrations’ each week. Everyone would send in an email listing their work/experiences and then this would be circulated to keep people updated.

What tended to happen, all too often, is that the busiest people didn’t find time to fill it in, felt they didn’t get appropriate recognition and got progressively grumpier. That is why HR is tough. Designing systems around people is complicated.

Anyway, I’m stealing the format to do a quick overview of #CIPD13. Most of the bloggers have written beautifully reflective pieces. Welcome to my bullet points

Celebrations

  • As a networking opportunity it was incredible. I went to Facebook today and I’m off to Innocent Drinks soon. These opportunities came as a direct result of the event.
  • My love of Dan Pink is well documented. I was lucky enough to see him twice during the conference and to take part in a Q+A with him. That was an exceptional opportunity and he genuinely engaged
  • I got to see an overview of the Crossrail project that really helped me reflect on how much work can mean to people
  • I dropped into plenty of the sessions in the main hall and enjoyed the variety and content. Great, short sessions
  • I got an hour with the CIPD CEO and then another hour with the Deputy CEO. They were open to challenge (which was good because I challenged) and the debate felt worthwhile. They listened. I realise this contact time was atypical of most delegates experience, so it feels important to note the time they gave to random people like me
  • The CIPD were very gracious in supporting the book – still available to buy.

I met some great people and shared in their energy and enthusiasm. That’s always the standout isn’t it…

Frustrations

  • The opening keynote was flat. It really disappointed me and felt slightly shallow and by the the book (and very ‘buy the book’). I’ve seen the speakers before and they were ten times better when I did. I would have far preferred to hear more from Peter on his thoughts about the profession
  • More CEOs or people who are ‘not HR’ would have been great. HR is business, more people from the broader business would have been useful.’My HR team did this and this is what it did’.
  • I agree with Sukh Pabial about the lack of diversity in the speakers
  • The hack update was great in terms of content from the hackers, but the whole process feels a bit slow and not action focused enough. The hack model is about design – real life is about implementation and momentum. A lot of people signed up for the Hack – I’m not sure how many have been retained
  • I heard some really closed thinking from people, including a horrible description of how different generations learn (‘older people just want to be talked at in classrooms’)
  • I heard some really risk averse responses to ideas. It’s seemed unless an idea comes gift wrapped people won’t run with it. How would that work in your organisation? Well, that is something you are paid to work out. I get that we need to manage risk, but we also are in the business of growth and that involves encouraging risk.
  • It would have been great for the main sessions to be more interactive. If we are updating on the hack then… let’s hack. Send people away to discuss Dan Pink – do things to involve the audience. One person speaking to several hundred has less benefit than hundreds exploring a concept. If a group of HR people designed an internal event it would never be this formulaic. More on the fringe, more interaction, more involvement, more commitment, more exploration = better results

A few notes to give context on the above.

  • As I tweeted and blogged for the CIPD I didn’t pay to enter the event. I’m probably biased and they did provide me with biscuits which increases the probability of this further
  • I’m not a member of the CIPD, I never have been. If I’ve been positive about them it’s due to them deserving it
  • I attended a range of events across the 2 days and thoroughly enjoyed the evenings

#CIPD13 – day 1 = reflections and connections

I find people interesting. That’s why I enjoy bumbling about in this profession.

I can’t network, I’m just not wired to think about people that way, but I do love meeting new people and chatting to them. Some people might argue that is networking, but I always think the distinction is in intent.

I’m not sure what I expected from the CIPD conference, but this is what I got in addition to the formal sessions. Interesting connections. I hope other people had similarly randomly good experiences.

I got…

– about an hour of Peter Cheese’s time (the CIPD CEO), talking about the event itself, social media, the CIPD’s future and the evolution of business practices. Someone took this photo of me, seemingly, in a Pacino-like rant as we talked, whilst in the background the lovely Julie Dryborough can’t quite believe what I’ve said to Peter http://instagram.com/p/gYgoRLPCjo/

– about an hour of the Deputy CEO’s time, talking about how much of the CEO’s time I had taken up

– the business card of the CEO of the Human Resources Professionals of Canada, specifically so that I can send him a link to the book (Humane, Resourced – free until the end of the conference, #1 bestselling HR book on Amazon, a host of awesome thoughts on HR from 50 different authors, I sort of had to mention it – http://www.amazon.co.uk/Humane-Resourced-A-Book-Blogs-ebook/dp/B00GA323TW/ref=zg_bs_362191031_7)

– a trip to Facebook (a long held ambition of mine)

– a trip to see the fine folk at Innocent Drinks (a long held ambition of mine)

– to meet one of the candidates from The Apprentice (this adds to an unexpected trip to the BBC breakfast studio yesterday

When I add the above to a quite brilliant insight into the Crossrail project and a host of interesting conversations, well, that isn’t a bad day. Not a bad day at all.

The only thing that could make it better would be an early morning session with Doug Shaw and Meg Peppin tomorrow – and a bacon butty too…

#CIPD13 Leading People through Organisational Change

Andrew Wolstenholme (CEO Crossrail, that is a quite a big project)

It’s a great start when someone says ‘I’m going to tell you a story’. The story of the Crossrail project so far was captivating and enjoyable.

Observation – HR is about business, having a CEO talk about business is a really useful thing. We are in business, you learn from people who do business exceptionally – regardless of ‘discipline’. The world is out there, invite it in.

The best quotes from the session

Here are my favourite awesome quotes from that interesting story.If you think the word awesome is inappropriate, well, you probably weren’t here.

‘there’s lot’s of responsibility out there, go and find it’

‘my job is to get the right team around me and to create an environment where they can excel’

‘my the end of today we’ll have created another 4m of tunnel under London’

‘the challenge is to move frontiers forward faster than we are currently able to’

‘some of the inspiration for now, is understanding how inspirational leaders were in the past’

‘aligned objectives keep everyone together’

‘we believe it is in our power to make things better for people’

‘skate to where the puck will be’

‘if you get safety right, only then do you have permission to talk about time and costs’

‘what would we have to do to be seen as an organisation where innovation is a definitive output?’

‘we want to be in a place where we are wealthy in giving ideas up to other people’

‘pigs do fly’

‘it’s fine to be different and to be yourself’

‘give people ‘I was there’ moments’

‘make people part of your story to make them part of an industry’

‘what do I want of HR? Understand my business. Provide expert counsel. Have the courage to challenge.Be a troubleshooter. Envision the future’

‘give people work where they can go and tell their children and grandchildren’

Thomas the Tank Engine

PS – safety messages on the back of gloves – genius. Internal innovation at its simplest and most effective.

Keynote address at #CIPD13

Peter Cheese (CIPD head honcho), Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones (very smart people who make you reflect on your quality of leadership) are delivering the opening speeches. The future of the CIPD and the best workplaces will be covered… I’m hunched over my keyboard… I’ve got a press pass and am looking forward to it – stand by for bullet points… this is a bam, bam review of the session.

Peter’s session

What did I learn?

i) it’s a very big hall

ii) Social media presence is going to be massive at this conference

iii) CIPD is pledging to do more, better and on a broader landscape (SME’s get a special focus, as do consultants – which makes me feel special…)

iv) The world is changing – we probably knew that but it’s actually something we forget all too often

v) The science of HR is a key opportunity for the profession, it is our foundation – it is about people not process

vi) CIPD are working with Ulrich on a piece of work that is beyond Ulrich because Ulrich never meant for Ulrich to happen in that way. I’m collaborating with them on a ‘beyond D’Souza’ piece for 2014

Creating the best workplace on earth – Rob and Gareth

What did they say…

i) HR is in the truth business, not ‘what is new’ but ‘what is true’

ii) exceptional performance is not luxury, it’s a survival technique. Its tough out there kids

iii) be yourself more with skill

iv) a key question is ‘why should anyone work here?’ – culture, performance, employer brand, engagement – all tricky

v) look at dreams, reality isn’t there yet

vi) modern leadership is as much about authenticity of task and place as anything else, it’s about DREAMS – see below…

D – difference, I can be myself here. Beyond diversity. Close down the ‘department of rules’ that is HR. Allow people to go a little bit beyond by being different. Build cohesion without homogenisation. Encourage conflict. Nurture characters. Involve the line in recruitment, selection and induction. Recruit a few people who don’t fit in.

R – radical honesty. Say what is really going on. HR can no longer be the keeper of corporate secrets, tell people the truth before they have to discover it. Don’t sanitise the bad news. Confront the elephant in the room (I think that’s what he meant). Can/would everyone sign their name on a comment on your intranet? Would there be comfort in that.

E -Extra Value. the task for an organisation is to add value to people to attract people who can add value to the organisation. Think volunteers at the Olympics or McDonalds investing in people’s training. Ducati use Ducati riders to feed into their engine design. Be the place where the best want to strut their stuff. Let people grow on the job and then be creative about training.

Ducati Logo
Ducati Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A -authenticity. You know where we are coming from and what we stand for. If we compromise to achieve higher profits, what have you achieved? You need a rooted sense of identity, roots are important. Undisputed origins.  Live the culture obsessively. Leaders need to model the values. Be vigilant on brand and culture. Link the individual to the organisation. Acknowledge legacy.

M – meaning. The work makes sense. Lack of sense can be caused by scale, division of labour or time lags. Help people feel enriched and not knackered. Help your people find meaning. Enjoy both work and leisure. Help connect things to avoid silos – and the worship of isolated smart people. Community – life is changing and so is the time spent in work in your lifetime. Community building needs to be simpler *hint, twitter and social media…*. Provide a cause, profit alone is only so compelling. Make a difference to the world (or lives within the world). Profitability does not always come from profit orientation. Organise around enthusiasm.Work on connections. Build the right social architecture to help create belonging

S -simple rules – the dream org is full of stupid rules. It isn’t anarchy it is sense. Freedom rest upon constraint and good rules. Simple and agreed. Systematisation and bureaucracy aren’t the same thing. Culture codes (call, don’t email) are safeguards, not threats. Be vigilant to prevent rule creep. Involve and check. Keep things fair.

That all seemed like a very sensible place to start. More to come…There is optimism…there is a whole future to fill and people really want to do good work

New: Collective decisions – the Book of Blogs

Things you need to know – new things are here… read on….don’t think you’ve seen it all before. There are some decisions to be made and you need to be aware of them – even if you don’t want to have a say. If you haven’t seen any of the blogs regarding this before I’d suggest you start here https://ddsouzadotcom.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/the-book-of-blogs-if-we-build-it/ PART A – General update The deadline is still 16th August for submissions. If you can get them in earlier that would be great – as you can see from the list below the book if filling up nicely and with a great range of topics being written about (with genuine insight and flair). Thanks to everyone who has contributed so far. If you are waiting on a reply from me for anything then please nudge me via Twitter and I’ll get back to you. I remain delighted that this is a genuinely international project and would like to thank Steve Browne and Broc Edwards for their support in the last week. We still lack a title. If you have any suggestions please leave them in the comments.  Simon Heath suggested ‘Practical Magic: Smoke, mirrors and human capital’ or ‘Human Realists: The future face of HR’. My suggestions have been nowhere near as good. Tim Scott has now suggested ‘Otherwise engaged’ – I think ‘Alternatively Engaged’ might also work. Select your favourite option to vote PART B – The money thing got a bit trickier, but not too tricky As anyone following this project knows we have been working on the assumption that Amazon will allow the book to be sold on Kindle for the grand price of free. Having investigated further (thanks to Simon Jones and Broc Edwards for the steer) Amazon will only publish under the following conditions

  • It is exclusively available to Amazon for 90 days (this shouldn’t be a problem)
  • We set a price of at least 99c (a price greater than 0c is a problem if you don’t want to make money)
  • We receive 70% of the sale price (I’m walking you through this slowly, 70% of 99c is still more than ‘no money’)
  • We can only set the price to free for 5 days in every 90 (meaning 85 days out of 90 it isn’t free, thanks for sticking with me)

Since, as per the initial scope,  I really don’t want to make any money on this my suggestion is we proceed as follows 1. We continue to publish on Amazon 2. We charge the lowest possible price (bizarrely Amazon can raise it if it wants and we don’t control it, but that will be the starting point) 3. We make the book free for five days at the earliest possible opportunity 4. Any author who contributes can have an electronic version sent to them to upload to their Kindle (if they don’t want to brave the store) can have one 5. All proceeds go to charity If you have suggestions for charities please leave them in the comments. I will then either run a survey to select a charity or if we don’t have many suggestions we’ll divide the money between them. It won’t be much money, but it will be something towards a good cause. If you don’t want to progress with the book on these grounds I completely understand, let me know and I’ll remove any content you have entered Suggested charities so far: OCD Action, Mind, Brook Part C – update on bloggers, content and a refreshed FAQ

  1. @simonheath1 – Simon Heath – submitted: A Sense of Proportion (as well as contributing an entry, the incomparable Simon Heath, will also be creating the cover illustration)
  2. @Projectlibero – Jon Bartlett
  3. @TimScottHR – Tim Scott submitted: There’s no such thing as ‘best practice’
  4. @HR_Gem – Gemma Reucroft submitted: A little more conversation
  5. @OD_optimist – Meg Peppin submitted:Trust me, I’m in HR
  6. @dougshaw1 – Doug Shaw – submitted: In Fear of Fear 
  7. @LadyLoki – Niki Rosenbaum
  8. @ruchikaabrol – Ruchika
  9. @Malcolmlouth – Malcolm Louth
  10. @StephenTovey13 – Stephen Tovey submitted: Watch the children play
  11. @paperclipgirl – Louisa de Lange
  12. @Jawaddell – Julie Waddell submitted: Succession planning: Corporate snakes and ladders
  13. @HRManNZ – Richard Westney – submitted: Collaboration is the new Competitive Advantage
  14. @sterling_amanda – Amanda Sterling submitted: What can HR learn from Lean manufacturing?
  15. @Jsarahwatshr – Jane Watson
  16. @KateGL – Kate Griffiths-Lambeth submitted: People are strange
  17. @KingfisherCoach – Ian Pettigrew submitted: Finding ‘friends’ you don’t like!
  18. @conmossy – Conor Moss
  19. @dds180 – me
  20. @bphilp – Bob Philpin submitted: Hiring our way out of the UK Leadership Crisis with Big Data
  21. @fourgroups – Four Groups – submitted: A Physics of People
  22. @sukhpabial – Sukh Pabial – submitted: What is hope?
  23. @verawoodhead – Vera Woodhead – submitted: No need to act like a Man. Women in leadership
  24. @myhr_nz    – Jason Ennor submitted: Building a slide at work: A true HR competency?
  25. @BenMorton2 – Ben Morton –submitted: Leadership in a VUCA world
  26. @IanandMJ -Ian Davidson –submitted: Why thinking in averages is below average thinking
  27. @ariadneassoc – Simon Jones
  28. @octopusHR – David Richter submitted: The Innovator’s Dilemma – Would you do any different? 
  29. @MrAirmiles – Jose Franca
  30. @MorrisElise – Elise Morris
  31. @sineadcarville – Sinead Carville
  32. @engagingemma – Emma Lloyd submitted: It is decision time ~ Round 1 ~ Heart vs Brain?
  33. @kat_hounsell – Kat Hounsell submitted: A Human Instinct
  34. @fuchsia_blue – Julie Drybrough
  35. @pontecarloblue – Amanda Arrowsmith submitted: Let’s be more Avengers than Minions
  36. @wendyaspland – Wendy Aspland submitted: if the workplace were a motorway
  37. @HRswitchon – Nicola Barber submitted: Bubble Busters
  38. @mervyndinnen – Mervyn Dinnen
  39. @damiana_HR – Damiana Casile
  40. @EmilydouglasHC – Emily Douglas
  41. @MeghanMBiro – Meghan Biro
  42. @DwaneLay – Dwane Lay
  43. @PamelaRoss – Pamela Ross
  44. @Nicky_T – Nicky Texeira
  45. @Lembitopik – Lembit Öpik  submitted: HR challenges on the USS Enterprise
  46. @LetSdeG – Leticia S. de Garzón submitted: Everyone needs a bad boss
  47. @zoemounsey – Zoe Mounsey
  48. @Susanpopoola – Susan Popoola
  49. @academyofrock -Peter Cook submitted: Punk Rock HR -A Manifesto for Simplicity, Brevity and Authenticity in HR
  50. @mindstrongltd – Tracey Davidson submitted: RIP Unproductive, Boring Meetings – How to Breath Life Back into Your Meetings 
  51. @brocedwards – Broc Edwards
  52. @sbrownehr – Steve Browne submitted: Release your inner Dali!
  53. @workessence – Neil Usher submitted: Barefoot in the heart: Part 3
  54. @injiduducu – Inji Duducu submitted: The Simple Key to High Performance Organisations
  55. @Honeydew_health – Honeydew Health submitted: The Absence Acid Test
  56. @AnneTynan – Anne Tynan submitted:Disabled HR Professionals = An Enabled Human Resources Profession

FAQ (it stands for Faked Anticipated Questions) Why did you decide to do this?  I had the idea on a whim when I was thinking about crowdsourcing and in particular this list of HR social influencers http://list.ly/l/5qg. It seemed like a nice community project and, as I enjoy the content shared on HR blogs so much, I thought it might be nice to collate it. I then shot out an impulsive tweet and things took off from there. So, what is your motivation? My motivation is very much about giving people an open space to create as individuals, whilst at the same point creating something as a group. I’m unlikely to get a job from this (if you’d like to hire me have a look at goo.gl/fySbh  ) but  I currently have some space in my days I thought it would be fun to build something. The book will be priced at free *update 30/07 -when it isn’t available as free it will be priced as cheaply as possible – and all proceeds will go to charity*, so this isn’t a stealth commercial project. It is a community project, plain and simple. I like ideas, I have the time to invest in helping and motivating people to share theirs. If you agree to take part then please understand that this is the ethos and don’t ask be complicated questions about who owns the rights etc. I simply don’t know and am probably disinclined to make things more complicated, if you are worried about this then just don’t take part. If you can think of it as a giant collection of guest blogs then you are in the right place. What are the entry criteria? Anyone can contribute – it can be their first blog or their hundredth. It can be new or their favourite old blog. It just needs to make sense standing alone. I’m sort of hoping that we do get to showcase some new bloggers and that the experience helps them go on to create more, that would make the project worthwhile in itself. There is no quality control – if someone has taken the trouble to write it then I will take the time to publish it. I haven’t approached anyone directly as I wanted people who were involved in the project and didn’t want to place any pressure on people to contribute. Please don’t attempt to sell a product – that is the only thing that won’t be acceptable. What are the timescales? A month from today for the content (!) should be enough for the length of writing required. So by 16/08 please have your content submitted or uploaded (see below). If you are able to do it earlier then please do, as there is only one of me so having 30 arrive on deadline day will doubtless cause issues. *cough, cough* but you don’t know anything about publishing do you?  No, I don’t, good spot. I do, however, love new technology and I’m also able to use Google. The combination of these things has led me to PressBook which is like a communal WordPress tool that will allow people to upload their own content and then for me to publish the content as an eBook to make available on Amazon etc. So we are all uploading our own material? It would be really helpful if once you have written it you could upload it yourself. If you write it in WordPress it brings everything over quite painlessly.Send me your email, I’ll send you a log in and then you can just paste your material in as a new chapter *update 22/07 – apparently this is quite painless*. Click on text and then new chapter… If this seems like the scariest process in the world then there is a two step process i) attempt it yourself, you only get to live this life once and being in fear of useful things isn’t very useful ii) send me your content directly – I don’t want anyone to suffer undue emotional distress in what should be a pleasant process How will the book be structured? I’m undecided. I might attempt to collate similar entries together or deliberately leave them apart. Who knows? It’s fun embracing an open approach. What if everyone writes on the same topics?  I don’t think they will, but if they do then we will still have a book – just on a narrow range of topics. My experience is that people have their own style which means at the very least people will offer different angles on topics. Is there anything I can’t do? Please don’t link to any material that we don’t have rights for.  I like putting video and pictures in my blogs, if you are doing so then please make sure you aren’t breaking the law when you are doing so. What will it be called? I haven’t a clue. I’m accepting suggestions. In fact if you send me suggestions I’ll run a poll and we can choose together. That is how collaborative this can be. Can I contact you with questions? Yes, I’m weak on Geography, but I’m pretty strong in most other areas. You can vote more than once below…

Update: The Book of Blogs 22/07

Quick recap: The Book of Blogs is an upcoming book of HR/OD/L+D/Business blogs that we are attempting to produce as a crowdsourced project, with conception to publication on Amazon in a total of less than 2 months. Currently we are making amazing progress. Thanks to everyone who has agreed to contribute.

This week’s milestones

Milestone 1 – I’ve just finished the next phase of the experiment. This involved exporting the content that we have so far to an Amazon Kindle.  There are some problems with spacing, but it has worked. I have been able to open the book and the links within it using my PC, android devices and an original Kindle. I may have jumped up and down in excitement a small amount. Bloggers:  It’s worth noting that links to video will work on all of these except the original Kindle

Milestone 2 – not only did we have our first blogs added via the online software, but we are now up to 7 having been added, well in advance of the deadline of 16/08. Thanks to @dougshaw1 for kicking it off. If we can keep a steady stream coming in then that will really help me manage my time effectively and help ensure the formatting is correct etc. Apparently the upload process is pretty painless, which is good news

Milestone 3 – the goal last week was to hit 30 contributors. Given that we are now standing at 49 and counting we have definitely exceeded expectations

Milestone 4 – I am delighted to welcome a number of US contributors to the project, something I wanted to happen last week,  including 2 bloggers who were in the top 10 of the recent Huffington Post  list of Social HR Influencers. I’m really happy about this, not just because I know they’ll provide great quality, but also because I think it will be amazing for some first time bloggers to be published alongside them

Milestone 5 – we still need a name, that will be the next milestone. Please make any suggestions you have to me and I’ll set up a vote in a few weeks time

  1. @simonheath1 – Simon Heath – as well as contributing an entry, the incomparable Simon Heath, will also be creating the cover illustration. 
  2. @Projectlibero – Jon Bartlett
  3. @TimScottHR – Tim Scott
  4. @HR_Gem – Gemma Reucroft submitted: A little more conversation
  5. @OD_optimist – Meg Peppin
  6. @dougshaw1 – Doug Shaw – submitted: In Fear of Fear 
  7. @LadyLoki – Niki Rosenbaum
  8. @ruchikaabrol – Ruchika
  9. @Malcolmlouth – Malcolm Louth
  10. @StephenTovey13 – Stephen Tovey submitted: Watch the children play
  11. @paperclipgirl – Louisa de Lange
  12. @Jawaddell – Julie Waddell
  13. @HRManNZ – Richard Westney – submitted: Collaboration is the new Competitive Advantage
  14. @sterling_amanda – Amanda Sterling
  15. @Jsarahwatshr – Jane Watson
  16. @KateGL – Kate Griffiths-Lambeth
  17. @KingfisherCoach – Ian Pettigrew
  18. @conmossy – Conor Moss
  19. @dds180 – me
  20. @bphilp – Bob Philpin
  21. @fourgroups – Four Groups – submitted: A Physics of People
  22. @sukhpabial – Sukh Pabial – submitted: What is hope?
  23. @verawoodhead – Vera Woodhead – submitted: No need to act like a Man. Women in leadership
  24. @myhr_nz    – Jason Ennor
  25. @Joolztybura – Julia Tybura
  26. @BenMorton2 – Ben Morton –submitted: Leadership in a VUCA world
  27. @IanandMJ -Ian Davidson –submitted: Why thinking in averages is below average thinking
  28. @ariadneassoc – Simon Jones
  29. @octopusHR – David Richter submitted: How to recognise and nurture disruptive innovation
  30. @MrAirmiles – Jose Franca
  31. @MorrisElise – Elise Morris
  32. @sineadcarville – Sinead Carville
  33. @engagingemma – Emma Lloyd submitted: It is decision time ~ Round 1 ~ Heart vs Brain?
  34. @kat_hounsell – Kat Hounsell
  35. @TashTasticNZ – Tash Pieterse
  36. @fuchsia_blue – Julie Drybrough
  37. @pontecarloblue – Amanda Arrowsmith
  38. @wendyaspland – Wendy Aspland
  39. @HRswitchon – Nicola Barber
  40. @mervyndinnen – Mervyn Dinnen
  41. @damiana_HR – Damiana Casile
  42. @EmilydouglasHC – Emily Douglas
  43. @MeghanMBiro – Meghan Biro
  44. @DwayneLay – Dwayne Lay
  45. @PamelaRoss – Pamela Ross
  46. @Nicky_T – Nicky Texeira
  47. @Lembitopik – Lembit Öpik  submitted: HR challenges on the USS Enterprise
  48. @LetSdeG – Leticia S. de Garzón
  49. @zoemounsey – Zoe Mounsey
  50. @Susanpopoola – Susan Popoola
  51. @academyofrock -Peter Cook
  52. @mindstrongltd – Tracey Davidson
  53. @brocedwards – Broc Edwards

FAQ (it stands for Faked Anticipated Questions)

Why did you decide to do this? 

I had the idea on a whim when I was thinking about crowdsourcing and in particular this list of HR social influencers http://list.ly/l/5qg. It seemed like a nice community project and, as I enjoy the content shared on HR blogs so much, I thought it might be nice to collate it. I then shot out an impulsive tweet and things took off from there.

So, what is your motivation?

My motivation is very much about giving people an open space to create as individuals, whilst at the same point creating something as a group. I’m unlikely to get a job from this (if you’d like to hire me have a look at goo.gl/fySbh  ) but  I currently have some space in my days I thought it would be fun to build something. The book will be priced at free, so this isn’t a stealth commercial project. It is a community project, plain and simple. I like ideas, I have the time to invest in helping and motivating people to share theirs. If you agree to take part then please understand that this is the ethos and don’t ask be complicated questions about who owns the rights etc. I simply don’t know and am probably disinclined to make things more complicated, if you are worried about this then just don’t take part. If you can think of it as a giant collection of guest blogs then you are in the right place.

What are the entry criteria?

Anyone can contribute – it can be their first blog or their hundredth. It can be new or their favourite old blog. It just needs to make sense standing alone. I’m sort of hoping that we do get to showcase some new bloggers and that the experience helps them go on to create more, that would make the project worthwhile in itself. There is no quality control – if someone has taken the trouble to write it then I will take the time to publish it. I haven’t approached anyone directly as I wanted people who were involved in the project and didn’t want to place any pressure on people to contribute. Please don’t attempt to sell a product – that is the only thing that won’t be acceptable.

What are the timescales?

A month from today for the content (!) should be enough for the length of writing required. So by 16/08 please have your content submitted or uploaded (see below). If you are able to do it earlier then please do, as there is only one of me so having 30 arrive on deadline day will doubtless cause issues.

*cough, cough* but you don’t know anything about publishing do you? 

No, I don’t, good spot. I do, however, love new technology and I’m also able to use Google. The combination of these things has led me to PressBook which is like a communal WordPress tool that will allow people to upload their own content and then for me to publish the content as an eBook to make available on Amazon etc.

So we are all uploading our own material?

It would be really helpful if once you have written it you could upload it yourself. If you write it in WordPress it brings everything over quite painlessly.Send me your email, I’ll send you a log in and then you can just paste your material in as a new chapter *update 22/07 – apparently this is quite painless*. Click on text and then new chapter…

If this seems like the scariest process in the world then there is a two step process

i) attempt it yourself, you only get to live this life once and being in fear of useful things isn’t very useful

ii) send me your content directly – I don’t want anyone to suffer undue emotional distress in what should be a pleasant process

How will the book be structured?

I’m undecided. I might attempt to collate similar entries together or deliberately leave them apart. Who knows? It’s fun embracing an open approach.

What if everyone writes on the same topics? 

I don’t think they will, but if they do then we will still have a book – just on a narrow range of topics. My experience is that people have their own style which means at the very least people will offer different angles on topics.

Is there anything I can’t do?

Please don’t link to any material that we don’t have rights for.  I like putting video and pictures in my blogs, if you are doing so then please make sure you aren’t breaking the law when you are doing so.

What will it be called?

I haven’t a clue. I’m accepting suggestions. In fact if you send me suggestions I’ll run a poll and we can choose together. That is how collaborative this can be.

Can I contact you with questions?

Yes, I’m weak on Geography, but I’m pretty strong in most other areas.